The Other Stuff

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ohgreenw0rld:

Signal boost

ohgreenw0rld:

Signal boost

(Source: cannabuzzed)

artofiyandejesus:

Not Here, Not There - Oil on Canvas

2/5  of paintings I made for Sehnsucht, a two-man show I had last August 27, 2014 at Vinyl on Vinyl Gallery

© Iyan De Jesus 2014

clickholeofficial:


‘I Let Everyone Down’: A Blogger Apologizes For Not Posting In A While

clickholeofficial:

‘I Let Everyone Down’: A Blogger Apologizes For Not Posting In A While

astronomy-to-zoology:

Wire-crested Thorntail (Discosura popelairii)
…a  rare and striking species of hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Where it inhabits solely inhabits lowland forests, and is not tolerant of secondary habitats. Like most striking plumaged birds wire-crested thorntails are sexually dimorphic with lacking the long “wire” crests and “thorn” tails of males. In typical humming bird fashion wire-crested thorntails feed on nectar from flowers, but will occasionally take insects as well. 
Currently Discosura popelairii is listed as near threatened by the IUCN, as it faces accelerating threats from deforestation in the Amazon Basin. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Apodiformes-Trochilidae-Discosura-D. popelairii
Image: Bill Bouton

astronomy-to-zoology:

Wire-crested Thorntail (Discosura popelairii)

…a  rare and striking species of hummingbird which occurs in Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Where it inhabits solely inhabits lowland forests, and is not tolerant of secondary habitats. Like most striking plumaged birds wire-crested thorntails are sexually dimorphic with lacking the long “wire” crests and “thorn” tails of males. In typical humming bird fashion wire-crested thorntails feed on nectar from flowers, but will occasionally take insects as well. 

Currently Discosura popelairii is listed as near threatened by the IUCN, as it faces accelerating threats from deforestation in the Amazon Basin. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Apodiformes-Trochilidae-Discosura-D. popelairii

Image: Bill Bouton

fullcravings:

S’mores Butter Cups

fullcravings:

S’mores Butter Cups

thecomicsvault:

Strange & CleaSTRANGE TALES #125 (Oct. 1964)Art by Steve Ditko & George BellWords by Steve Ditko

thecomicsvault:

Strange & Clea
STRANGE TALES #125 (Oct. 1964)
Art by Steve Ditko & George Bell
Words by Steve Ditko

Sep 9

archiemcphee:

San Francisco-based design professor and illustrator Miguel Cardona transforms ordinary paper coffee cups into bold works of art. Because of the curved surface of his canvas of choice, each piece is rendered freehand and he thoroughly enjoys the challenges that this presents:

"You have this three-dimensional object that is in your hands, you can pull the cup in a different direction and hold the pen still. You can also hide a lot of flawed perspective. You don’t need a desk, it can be done anywhere, and to protect it, you can stack it in another blank cup. The cup itself can hold your art supplies and is itself, a display stand, it’s quite the perfect design."

Cardona’s subjects vary from pop culture character and icons to robots, monsters, and even bodily organs. But these beautiful illustrations aren’t quite as awesome as what he does with them. Miguel sells each finished piece for $20 and donates 100% of the proceeds to Project Night Night, which donates baby blankets, children’s books, and toys to children in homeless shelters.

Visit Miguel Cardona’s website to check out more of his fantastic illustrated coffee cups.

[via Design Taxi and Cool Hunting]

Sep 9
theonion:

The new Apple Watch allows wearers to start and stop the flow of time

theonion:

The new Apple Watch allows wearers to start and stop the flow of time

theonion:



Experts: “We can just keep using the chairs we have.”

theonion:

Jul 6

montereybayaquarium:

Nature’s Fireworks: We Discover the Flower Hat Jelly Life Cycle

Some things are worth waiting for – even if it takes 12 years.

Our jelly biologists have discovered the elusive life cycle of Olindias formosus – the stunning flower hat jelly, whose multicolored, fluorescent-tipped tentacles are like a living fireworks show.

The flower hat jelly was first discovered in waters off Japan over 100 years ago, but its life cycle was a mystery. Biologists around the world have been eager to exhibit this gorgeous jelly, but were unable to culture it to adulthood. Now, after 12 years of research, we solved the mystery, and you can see them in The Jellies Experience special exhibition.

“We’re thrilled to discover the life cycle of the flower hat jelly,” said Senior Aquarist Wyatt Patry. “Our team succeeded through collaboration, diligence and a bit of good luck.”

Our discovery could lead to predicting dangerous jelly “blooms” in the wild. The flower hat jelly packs a powerful sting, enabling it to kill and eat fish – and harm humans. Blooms of hundreds or thousands of these jellies off Japan and Brazil have resulted in injuries to many beachgoers, and at least one death, Patry said.

About the Flower Hat Jelly

Found in coastal waters off southern Japan, Brazil and Argentina, and in the Mediterranean, the flower hat jelly has brilliant tentacles trailing from its translucent, pinstriped bell. Another set of curly tentacles under its bell can quickly unfurl and grab prey. This nocturnal species swims in the water column at night and attaches itself to the seafloor during the day.

Our work to understand the life cycle of this mysterious jelly began in 2002 during the Jellies: Living Art special exhibition, which ran from 2002 to 2008. That team was the first to successfully exhibit flower hat jellies in the United States, and culture fertilized eggs and larvae – another first.

Shining a Light on an Amazing Life Cycle

Patry said the current team’s initial breakthrough occurred with a redesigned exhibit that let flower hat jellies capture and eat live fish and kept them away from debris on the bottom. Patry said the team hoped those conditions would encourage successful reproduction – and they did.

Special blue lighting in the exhibit was the next breakthrough. The flower hat jellies, which are fluorescent, are in a gallery that interprets three different types of “lights” in certain jellies – fluorescence, bioluminescence and diffraction. About six months after putting a batch of flower hat jellies on exhibit, Patry noticed two previously unseen stages of their life cycle – polyps and tiny baby jellies.

“I was only able to see them because they are fluorescent, like the adults,” Patry said. “From there we worked with the polyps to refine the ideal food and temperature requirements for them to produce more babies.”